Wednesday, August 23, 2006

 

Clinical Anatomy for Medical Students, Edition 6, by Richard S Snell

I know a lot of people used Gray's Anatomy as their anatomy reference textbook, but I actually preferred Snell's Clinical Anatomy for Medical Students.
It is clear and concise, with clear diagrams and good quality X rays and CT images to illustrate the clinical relevance of various anatomical features.
What is most important is, however, as a core textbook aimed for USMLE candidates, it contains at the end of each chapter a clinical problem section which makes anatomy much more interesting and relevant to medicine, and actually serves the very good purpose of assessing how much you REALLY understood the chapter you've just studied.
I have kept this book even though I am not a budding surgeon at all - it's easy to use interface means that I can look up any forgotten anatomy information which becomes relevant in day-to-day clinical practice.



 

Getting Started!

Have just started this blog and it's actually simpler than what I'd expected! Hip hip hooray!
This is a blog specifically for doctors and people in health-allied professions.
I wanted to start this blog because of a simple reason - to give my personal recommendations on the useful medical books that I have discovered during my working career.
I am a training paediatrician. I have studied a good few medical textbooks, some really good ones, and some less so, in order to pass my exams.
Then I studied more paediatric books, to pass even more exams.
And now, I will be reading even more paediatric specialty books in order to keep myself up to date.
What I have found so far is, it is difficult to find good quality medical book reviews.
As a result, it is often difficult to decide which books are worth reading (and especially, buying to keep).
The books that I add to my blog will be the ones that genuinely helped me through the exams and through daily life as a physician.
I hope this will be of help to you and I wish you all the best in whichever medical or health-allied profession you are in.

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